The Art of Transformation
Formerly called Maison Martin Margiela, Maison Margiela is a French fashion house founded in Paris in 1988 by Belgian designer Martin Margiela and Jenny Meirens. The world of the House is based on the purity, deconstruction and transformation of pre-established rules.
Born in 1959, Martin Margiela graduated from the Royal Academy of Antwerp. Often affiliated with the Antwerp Six - among them Ann Demeulemeester, Walter Van Beirendonck, Dries Van Noten... - Margiela is not part of the same promotion. He continued his training alongside Jean-Paul Gaultier in particular, where he worked as an assistant for three years.
The first collection was created during the spring-summer 1989 season, with a fashion against the current of extravagance that characterized the era at the time. Following the minimalist and avant-garde furrow drawn a decade earlier by Yohji Yamamoto and Rei Kawakubo with Comme des Garçons, Margiela is gaining popularity, despite or despite the aura of mystery that surrounds and home, and the creator.
Conceptual and enigmatic aesthetics, white, ambiguity about genres, play on proportions: everything has helped to make Maison Margiela a stronghold of contemporary fashion.
Martin Margiela left his place as artistic director in 2009. The Maison received the Haute-Couture appellation in 2012. Two years later, John Galliano was appointed artistic director. He's still in post today.
Galliano has fun with the codes of hijacking and exaggeration so dear to Martin Margiela. The Fall/Winter 2017 collection is no exception.
The belts become gigantic, the aprons of the evening gowns are invited on silhouettes assembled with pieces of mesh, silk and leather. In a shaker, drop off a vintage pilot, an Oxford teacher and a socialite in Aspen, shake well and pour on an immaculate white catwalk. You have this winter's women's collection.
As for the Man, he will be seen under long sleeves - very long, in ripped suits and relaxed knits, wearing sports technical tops and leggings, and revisited classics. Non-conformism is chic.