CHADWICK OVEN - Some like it hot

CHADWICK OVEN - Some like it hot - LECLAIREUR

Summer, its ice cream, its beaches and its... pizza! We swoon at the idea of making our own well-balanced pizzas, perfectly cooked in an oven that respects itself, and respects them too, while we're at it. Hail to the Chadwick Oven, the very identified UFO, as spectacular as practical.

 

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It was created by designer Daniel Chadwick and engineer Guy Adams in response to a friend's great passion for the greatest Italian invention in history. It contains a porous stone base for even heat distribution. An ovoid object, the object of all our desires, the Chadwick Oven allows us to bake a single pizza - or unleavened bread, or focaccia, or naan, because our desires are limitless - in minutes. Skeptical? And yet...

 

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Preheating time? 10 minutes on gas. An adapter is also available, for the more electric among us. Once preheated, the oven temperature remains stable for hours. Chadwick Oven has its own stainless steel spatula, so you can slide your pizza in smoothly.

 

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Wake up your inner Italian chef. Prepare. Put it in the oven. Three minutes later, BAM! it's pizza time. The dough? Crisp just right, golden brown, enticing.

To make your mouth water, here are some recipes made in Leclaireur. And then a suggestion, summery and light, for an easy start: on a base of olive oil and chopped garlic, add shaved parmesan, candied tomatoes, asparagus and pine nuts. There you go, there you go, it smells like vacation, days that turn into evenings, naps in the shade, and...

 

For a love of pizza, day or night, LECLAIREUR offers you its favorite recipes...

The dough (which we like thin, very thin):
3/4 volumes (150ml) of warm water
1 teaspoon of yeast
2 volumes (250g) of flour
1/2 teaspoon of salt

In a bowl (or in a bowl, the old-fashioned way, like Peau d'Âne), pour the water and the yeast, and mix until it has completely dissolved and the result is close to the broth. Add the flour and salt and mix until you have a soft dough.

Place the dough, still very floured, on a clean work surface and collect any remaining flour in the bowl. Knead the dough for 5 minutes, until the flour has been completely absorbed. The dough should be slightly smooth and elastic, but still a little wet, without being sticky. If it sticks like gum, add more flour, one tablespoon at a time, until it reaches the right texture.

If timing permits, let the dough rest at least until ready to bake, or ideally until doubled in size (about 1 1/2 hours). Once risen, the dough can be used immediately or stored in the refrigerator for three days.

When you are ready to make your pizza, divide the dough in half with a metal spatula. Working with one half of the dough at a time, form a large disk with your hands.

Work from the middle of the dough outwards using the fleshy part of your palm to spread the dough, it should be no more than 6mm thick. MA-XI-MUM.

For an extra thin dough, use the big means. A rolling pin works well. If the dough tends to shrink, let it rest for 5 minutes before starting to flatten it again.

 

Our suggestions for water-to-mouth style toppings:

For a red base - purists, of which we are one, will wrinkle their noses at canned tomatoes and get their hands on fresh ones (yes, even out of season, and quite exceptionally) - layer:

Thin slices of tomatoes for the base - if you like your pizza with lots of tomatoes, spread them out in layers,

Nice slices of mozzarella di bufala,

Small slices of shishito pepper.

And sprinkle with oregano, marjoram, salt and pepper.

 

For a white base:

Cover the dough with a sumptuous layer of mascarpone.

Place thin pieces of celery on top (ideally marinated in lemon juice for a few hours beforehand).

Coarsely shave some bottarga from Martigues to taste.

Add a few capers and sprinkle with freshly chopped dill.

 

The Chadwick Oven is available, to go, at Leclaireur Hérold and Boissy d'Anglas.

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